What’s for pudding?

CHOCOLATE BUTTERSCOTCH TART
This is extremely rich and decadent.  Only eat when you are in a seriously chocolatey mood.  I had some today and just carried on picking and I feel very guilty now as my 4 year old son told me, “Mummy, you are a bit fat”.  So, indulge at your own risk!

Use a 26cm tart tin.

Pate Sucree 170g plain flour pinch of salt 85g unsalted butter 3 egg yolks 85g sugar 2 drops vanilla essence

Either – sift the flour and salt onto a clean surface and form a hollow circle with it, add the sugar, softened butter and eggs to the empty centre of the circle, put one hand behind your back and mash the butter, eggs and vanilla with your other hand at the same time as gradually drawing in the flour and salt until you have a dough.
– Flour the surface a bit and roll out the pastry and line a tart tin and put it in the fridge for half an hour.
– Heat the oven to 200degrees C and bake the pastry case with baking beans in it for 10 minutes or until the sides hold up.  Remove the beans and continue to bake for another 10 minutes until the centre is crisp but be careful to avoid browning the edges too much.  Put a bit of foil of any parts that are browning too much. Remove it from the oven and leave to cool.
or
– whizz all of the ingredients in a food processor then follow the post-forming of the pastry steps above.

Butterscotch sauce
50g butter
50g golden syrup
50g brown sugar
75ml cream

– Put equal quantities of butter, sugar and golden syrup in a pan over a low heat then turn it up when melted and bubble. Add cream.
– Take off heat.
– Add vanilla extract if you like.
– Spread over the base of the cooked and cooled pastry case.

Chocolate Filling
300g dark chocolate
200g milk chocolate
200mls double cream

I find that the balance of the two chocolates is a good one but by all means vary this according to your preference.  Bear in mind though that the butterscotch sauce is very sweet and so were you to increase the balance in the milk chocolate’s favour, it may be a little sickly sweet!

– Melt the chocolates and cream together.  I find the microwave for 1-2 minutes is fast and efficient though for a smoother finish, you may be better off pouring hot cream on top of the chocolate which will melt it.  Just be careful not to burn the cream…
–  Spread the  butterscotch sauce over base of the pastry case.
– Whip the chocolate mixture when cooled a little and pour on top of the butterscotch sauce.
– If you would like the tart to have a smooth surface, pour the chocolate in when it is still warm, a whipped up surface is achieved by cooling it a little more before adding it.
– Serve at room temperature for a creamy consistency.

SALTED CARAMEL TORT
The first time I had salt caramels, they were given to me by a lovely friend.  I found them more interesting than delicious.  So this recipe is not only interesting, but absolutely delicious; I think so anyway, and so say those who have tried it.  If you do not have such a sweet tooth, you may like to reduce the amount of caramel you add to the sponge.  This one is a matter of preference.

The first time I made this, I did so as a cake and so put a buttercream icing on top.  The second time, I did not use the icing but added salt caramel sauce.  So with the icing it could be a tea time cake with a twist, a delicious pudding with the caramel sauce, or a canape seen in the photograph; up to you.

Tort

5 eggs, 4 of them separated
250g granulated sugar
100mls water
250g ground almonds
½ tsp sea salt (I use Maldon sea salt which is less harsh than traditional table salt)

– Whisk the egg yolks until they are light in colour and a trail is left for a seconds when you lift the whisk.
– Place the sugar and water over a low heat.  When the sugar has completely dissolved, turn the heat up and bring to a fast simmer or boil, until it is a deep caramel colour, or 160 degrees C if you are using a sugar thermometer.
– While whisking the egg yolks, drizzle the caramel from a height on top of them. If you leave it to cool before drizzling, it will harden and will not therefore drizzle.  Do it from a height slowly so that it does not cook the eggs.
– Add a whole egg and mix in.  This ensures the mixture does not harden too much.  It may look a bit of a mess at this stage but do not worry….
– Mix in the ground almonds.
– Whisk the egg whites to medium-firm peak.  Add a third of the whites to the mixture and stir in.  This introduces the different consistency of the white, softens the mixture, and makes it easier to fold in the remaining whites.
– Fold in the remaining whites and tip into an 8inch springform cake tin.  If you are making canapes, then take a roasting tin (about 31cm x 22cm) and line it with baking paper.  Pour in the mixture and spread it out so that the tort will not be too deep and therefore be bite size when you cut it with a cutter.  This is not an exact measurement. Use whatever you have available to  bake it in; it does not really matter when you are making canapes, as long as the tort is not too deep.
– Bake in the oven at 175 degrees C for 40 minutes.  Check it after 20 minutes and put some foil on top if it is browning too quickly. When making the canapes it will cook faster because it is not as deep so you should be ready after about 20 minutes.
– Let it cool for ten minutes before removing it from the tin.

Salt Caramel sauce
120g granulated sugar
120 mls water
120mls double cream
½ tsp vanilla extract
½ tsp sea salt

– Heat the sugar and water over a low heat until dissolved. Turn the heat up until it is a deep caramel colour, or 160 degrees C if you have a thermometer.
– Add the cream,vanilla extract and salt and remove from the heat.

Salt Caramel Icing
100g unsalted butter
150g icing sugar
45g sugar
3 tbsp water
3 tbsp double cream

– Heat the sugar and water over a low heat until dissolved. Turn the heat up until it is a deep caramel colour, or 160 degrees C if you have a thermometer.
– Add the cream and vanilla extract and salt and remove from the heat. Leave until completely cool, about half an hour or so.
– Beat the softened butter and icing sugar until light and fluffy.  Add the cooled caramel and beat until light and fluffy.  Ice the torte
– You may decorate this the spun sugar. I am really not an expert at all but you could try repeating the caramel making process to when the sugar water mixture is 160 degrees C and at that point, remove from the heat and over a baking sheet, dipping a spoon or fork into the caramel, drizzle it quickly with into spun sugar if you are successful, or in shapes which may be used to adorn the top of the cake, or tip the whole lot onto the sheet so that when it is cool, you may break it into shards with which to decorate the tort.
– If you do like more of a kick from your salt caramels, then you may like to top iced canapes with a shard of Maldon sea salt.


FRUIT TART
The inclusion of this tart on this blog is not to introduce you to something new.  This is a delicious reminder of tarts traditionally found in France and the windows of patisseries in this country too.  It is here because it is so delicious that I am just reminding you.

Eaten within a couple of hours of preparing, the pastry will be crisp, the filling light and creamy, and the fruit will have bite.  Eaten a few hours after it has been made, the pastry will give more easily, the filling will have bonded with the pastry a little, and the fruit will have mellowed and become almost a part of the whole tart rather than an adornment.  Both are absolutely delicious, just different.  If you eat it a day or so after making it, its tantalising taste bud confirmation that this is the most delicous tart, will be less convincing.

         

Use a 26cm tart tin.

Pate Sucree
170g plain flour
pinch of salt
85g unsalted butter
3 egg yolks
85g sugar
2 drops vanilla essence

Either – sift the flour and salt onto a clean surface and form a hollow circle with it, add the sugar, softened butter and eggs to the empty centre of the circle, put one hand behind your back and mash the butter, eggs and vanilla with your other hand at the same time as gradually drawing in the flour and salt until you have a dough.
– Flour the surface a bit and roll out the pastry and line a tart tin and put it in the fridge for half an hour.
– Heat the oven to 200degrees C and bake the pastry case with baking beans in it for 10 minutes or until the sides hold up.  Remove the beans and continue to bake for another 10 minutes until the centre is crisp but be careful to avoid browning the edges too much.  Put a bit of foil of any parts that are browning too much. Remove it from the oven and leave to cool.
or
– whizz all of the ingredients in a food processor then follow the post-forming of the pastry steps above.

Creme Patissiere
200mls milk
3 egg yolks
45g caster sugar
30g plain flour
1/2 vanilla pod

– Heat the milk in a saucepan with the vanilla pod split in two, until little bubbles just appear at the edge.
– Cream the egg yolks and sugar and flour.
– Pour the warm milk over the mixture slowly, stirring all the time.
– Return the mixture to the pan and stir over a medium heat until it become lumpy and then keep stirring until the lumps subside.
– Press a piece of baking parchment or greaseproof paper over the surface of the mixture to prevent a skin from forming.

Assembly
Half a jar of apricot jam
Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, boysonberries, etc….
400ml double cream, whipped to medium peak

– Put the jam and a tablespoon of water over a low heat until blended, then seive into a bowl.
– Whizz the creme patissiere in a blender or whisk vigorously and then fold in the double cream.
– Place in the pastry case which has been removed carefully from the tin.
– Decorate with berries and using a pastry brush, lightly cover the result with the jam.

RASPBERRY GELATO
This is a lighter version of ice cream.  I am not sure I should really call it gelato but to me it is quite different to the ice cream I am used to.  While the cream is very much there, the amount is halved and replaced by milk

2 cups of raspberries
Half a cup of caster sugar plus 1 tbsp
500 mls milk
584ml double cream (ie a tub, please don’t worry about the 4mls if you are not using a typical British supermarket tub)
3 egg yolks

– Put the raspberries and sugar in a heavy based pan and gradually heat through so that the raspberrys release their juice and the sugar melt into a sweet raspberry sauce. Cool
– Make the milk custard by beating the yolks with 1tbsp caster sugar until a trail is left for a few seconds, when you lift the spoon and drizzle the mixture over itself.
– Heat the milk and when little bubbles begin to collect at the edges, before it boils, remove from the heat and beat it into the egg yolk sugar mixture.
– I tend to cheat at this point and put it in a microwavable bowl in the microwave on its lowest setting for 2 minutes at a time until it coats the back of a wooden spoon and has therefore made a custard.
– Alternatively, you may use the traditional method of putting the milk and yolk mixture into a heatproof bowl over a saucepan of boiling water (not allowing the water to touch the bowl) and stir and stir until it coats the back of a wooden spoon and has created a custard. Cool.
When cold, mix together, the raspberries, the milk custard and the double cream.  Pour into an ice cream maker or a container.  If doing this in a container, every twenty minutes for the first hour, beat the ice cream as vigorously as you are able, in order to create a mousse-like ice cream.  Then leave it in the freezer and before serving, remove it for 15 minutes or so until it is soft enough to serve.

As of now (1) people have had something to say...

  • teacher - Reply

    October 4, 2012 at 1:30 pm

    Hello from Years 1 and 2 Knighton House Orchard.We think that the salted caramel cakes should have icing on them! Also we would like to try the bullars .Goodbye!

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